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Former Atlanta Police Sargent Trevor King Convicted On Federal Charges of Using Excessive Force

Tyrone Carnegay (Photo credit: WSBTV

On October 13, 2014, a Walmart customer in Atlanta, Georgia was attacked by a security guard, accused of shoplifting.  The security officer was 48-year old, off-duty Atlanta police Sargent Trevor King.

King used his department issued expandable baton hitting the customer multiple times, breaking the customer’s leg in two places.  King alleged to seeing the customer, 53-year old Tyrone Carnegay, weigh a tomato then try to exit the store without paying.  However, Tyrone had a receipt for the tomato in the bag.

In April 2016, Tyrone filed a lawsuit. His attorney, Craig Jones, told the NY Daily News:

“He got whacked seven or eight times across the shin and actually broke both bones, both the fibula and the tibula,” Carnegay’s lawyer, Craig Jones, told the Daily News. “This tomato not only cost him the dollar they overcharged him. It also cost him over $75,000 in medical bills, which I intend to get them to pay many times over.”

The lawsuit names Walmart, King and another employee as defendants.

Tyrone was chained to his hospital bed.  The broken leg wasn’t his only injury.  He also suffered a ruptured artery that later oozed blood out of his cast.

Because of the cost of the tomato, Tyrone believed that he was overcharged, and after paying for it, returned to the produce section and checked the price on a scale.  He went back in line to challenge the cost, but then decided not to and left the line.  A security employee alerted King who assumed that Tyrone was leaving the store without paying for the tomato.  Tyrone had actually bought $20 worth of items in the store.

After the lawsuit was filed, the Atlanta Police Department opened an investigation. Read the rest of this entry

Baltimore Detectives Caught Planting Drugs.

SUPABUTTERFLY

Original Article

BALTIMORE — A Baltimore officer has been suspended after defense attorneys released a body camera video they said shows the officer planting drugs.

The 90 seconds of footage has police investigating their own officers, but officials say there is more to this story than a short video clip showing officers planting drugs, CBS Baltimore reports.

Officials have since released more video to back up their claims as they continue to investigate these serious allegations.

The footage in a Baltimore alley is clear, as it was recorded on police body cameras, but the reason why the Baltimore police officer appears to be planting drugs is not.

What we think we see, and if you slow down the video especially in the first five seconds, the officer appearing to place a red can underneath some trash, push the fence up, and hide it,” said public defender Debbie Katz Levi.

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Walker, Louisiana Police Officer Resigns After Found Placing Noose In Squad Room

An unnamed, high-ranking Walker Police officer, who was employed by the department for about a decade, has resigned after he was suspended for placing a noose inside the squad room of the department.  He was originally suspended for 3 days without pay.  A meeting to review the officer’s conduct and consider disciplinary action was scheduled, but was cancelled after the officer announced his resignation.

Louisiana law RS 14:40.5 prohibits a noose in a public place. Anyone convicted faces up to a $5,000 fine and one year in prison or both.  The Walker police Investigative Unit has asked Attorney General Jeff Landry’s Office to investigate for criminal charges.  The case has been handed over to the Livingston Parish Sheriff’s Office for criminal investigation.

Police Chief David Addison is new to the job.  The assistant chief is an African American.  A lieutenant, who is also Black, found the noose.  Security camera footage recorded the officer leaving the noose hanging in the department’s squad room.

Paperwork says that it was reported,
“You informed me that you fashioned the noose, or as you called it, the ‘slip knot,’ to pick with an arrestee that you had in custody…It was revealed to me via our department’s video cameras, that there was no arrestee present when you fashioned and displayed the cookie and noose in the squad room.”

Chief Addison is reported saying:

“Whether they’re white, black or oriental, we have a mixture here in Walker.  Everyone, I don’t care if you’re white, black, oriental, you will be treated fairly by my officers. This will not be tolerated period. This was poor judgment, bad character. It will not be tolerated with the Walker Police Department.”

WBRZ has a video and more on this story.

 

 

Chicago Police Escort Girls Without Fathers to ‘Daddy Daughter Dance’

GOOD BLACK NEWS

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article via clutchmagonline.com

The second annual “Daddy Daughter Dance” was held in Chicago over the weekend, and the event sponsored by the Chicago Police Department proved to be a success.

The event, which was held at the South Shore Cultural Center, matched up Chicago police officers with girls who don’t have fathers in their lives. Also in attendance were officers and their own daughters.

“After last year’s event, we had several officers and the young ladies that they escorted, they kept up with one another and it really bridged a gap,” said Sgt. Kimberly Woods. “It let the girls know that officers are just people too and we dance, and we dance funny like your dads do.”

The Chicago Police Department and the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives planned the dance to encourage healthy relationships between daughters and their fathers.

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Cops Tase, Sic Police Dog on Restrained Man – Man Wins Lawsuit

How in the heck does a person move their arm into a position demanded of them, when a dog is chewing on it?

Btx3's Blog

At some point the City Mayors, councils and elected figures have to be held into account for this.

WATCH: Cops hold man down and sic K-9 on him after beating him — for dancing in a parking lot

A Washington man has settled a lawsuit with the city of Tukwila after police officers assaulted him following a complaint that he was dancing in an industrial parking lot, reports the Seattle Times.

The city will pay Linson Tara $100,000 to settle a civil-rights lawsuit filed after the officers used Tasers, their fists and then a police dog on him while he was being restrained.

Tara was facing three counts of fourth-degree assault on police officers, but those charges were dropped when dash cam video showed one of the officers holding Tara on the hood of the police cruiser while his partner used a Taser on him.

Tara can then be…

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Police Officer Sentenced to 30 Months For Civil Rights Violation

In a disturbing surveillance video, Honolulu police officer Vincent Morre is seen attacking two men in a game room in September 5, 2014. The unprovoked attack injured one victim so badly that he suffered head lacerations and a broken bone in his hand.

In May 2015, Morre was charged with two counts of deprivation of rights under color of law, a federal civil rights violation offense. Morre plead guilty to the two courts.  On October 15, 2015, federal district court Judge J. Michael Seabright sentenced Morre to 30 months in prison. If he stood trial and was convicted, Morre could have been sentenced to 10 years. He will report to prison after the holidays. Read the rest of this entry

Baltimore Mayor Replaces Police Commissioner

TIME

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake replaced the city’s police commissioner Wednesday after officials called for his resignation in the wake of a report by the city’s police union criticizing his handling of riots in April.

In a statement released Wednesday afternoon, the mayor’s office said it had replaced Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts with Deputy Police Commissioner Kevin Davis.

The announcement came the same day that the Baltimore Fraternal Order of Police released a report highly critical of Batts’s handling of unrest in the city following the death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old unarmed black man who died in police custody.

Batts was appointed police commissioner in September 2012 and previously served as chief of police in Oakland, Calif.

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Thoughts for today, #171 …. “Not mutually exclusive”!!

EXACTLY!

It Is What It Is

JonPol

~~June 10, 2015~~ 

THIS SAYS IT ALL

I strongly believe that policemen do their job while risking their lives. Their loved ones stay at home expecting them to return safe but always have the lingering thought in the back of their minds. For this, we thank both the law enforcement officers and their families.

Yet, too many cases are coming to the forefront that makes the public question the status of the police departments all over the country.

We grieve for each and every one that loses their lives in the line of duty. Yet, because of the nature of their work, they should be held to high standards.

This statement sums up for us how we can respect all law enforcement officers yet also question what is happening and has happened at the time of this writing.

HortyRex©

~~GRAPHIC SOURCE~~

https://www.facebook.com/AlterNetNews

BLine

#ThoughtsForToday #173 #Quote #JonStewart #TrulyGrieve #OfficersLost #LineOfDuty #StillTroubled…

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DOJ Settles With Cleveland Over Police Conduct

The Justice Department has reached a settlement with the city of Cleveland over the conduct of its police officers, according to a Justice official, the latest case in which the Obama administration has investigated excessive use of force and the violation of constitutional rights by a local department.

The settlement, amid the growing national debate about American policing, is expected to be announced early this week, the official said. It comes just days after a judge acquitted a Cleveland police officer for his role in the fatal shooting of two unarmed people in a car in 2012 after officers thought the sound of the car backfiring was gunshots.

The Justice Department in December issued a scathing report that accused the Cleveland Police Department of illegally using deadly force against citizens. The Justice Department’s civil rights division found that the Cleveland police engaged in a “pattern or practice” of unnecessary force — including shooting residents, striking them in the head and spraying them with chemicals.

In one incident, an officer used a stun gun on “a suicidal, deaf man who committed no crime, posed minimal risk to officers and may not have understood officers’ commands.”

The police were also accused of repeatedly punching in the face a handcuffed 13-year-old boy who had been arrested for shoplifting.

The Cleveland report was released the month after a 12-year-old African American boy, Tamir Rice, was fatally shot by a white Cleveland police officer. Cleveland officers had responded to a 911 call that reported a person pointing a gun. It turned out to be a toy pistol.

A Justice Department spokeswoman would not comment on the settlement, which was first reported on the Web site of the New York Times.

When last year’s report about Cleveland was released, then-Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. traveled to the city to announce the findings and said the Justice Department and the city had agreed to establish an independent monitor who would oversee police reforms. The changes will include better training and better supervision of officers, Holder said.

There have been more than 20 investigation by the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division in the past 5 years. The investigations have resulted in 15 agreements with law enforcement agencies, including New Orleans and Albuquerque.  The Justice Department recently opened an investigation of the Baltimore police department.

UPDATE

Here is the consent decree that the Cleveland police department entered into with the government.

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On a separate matter, I will be off and on today — probably offline more than on.  Tomorrow, I might reblog some articles and unless something comes up that is really interesting, that might be the case for several days until I catch-up on some personal matters and begin feeling better.

Remember to keep the Golden Rule. 

Two South Carolina Police Officers Sentenced For Depriving Mentally Disabled Woman of Her Rights

Yesterday, federal Judge Bryan Harwell said that the bad actions of two officers ruined the good work of thousands of honest officers.

“This one incident can cause the public to lose respect and overshadow the good work, the hard work, done by thousands of officers every day,” Harwell said.

In October last year, Franklin Brown and Eric Walters pleaded guilty to deprivation of rights under color of law.  The DOJ took the case from the state and the officers reached the plea deals through federal prosecutors.

o-SC-COPS-facebookIt happened in April 2013 in Marion, South Carolina. Eric Walters was patrolling when he saw Melissa Davis walking out of the yard of a home for sale. He asked her what she was doing, thinking she might have broken into the home. He tased Melissa because she did not quickly respond. While on the ground, Walters ordered Melissa to put her hands behind her back, but he shocked her 4 more times with his taser before she could respond.

Franklin Brown responded to the scene, and saw Walters removing the taser probes from Melissa’s back. Walters had then determined that Melissa had not done anything wrong. However, Brown noticed that one of Melissa’s hands had slipped from her improperly applied handcuffs, and he used his taser on Melissa again. According to court documents, Melissa was not trying to fight or escape.

Prosecutors said that Brown shocked Melissa a total of three times, then offered to let her go if he could shoot her in the forehead with his Taser. Brown told the other officers at the scene he shot Melissa with his taser because he “did not want to touch that nasty bitch.” Brown’s statement is a part of his plea agreement. Read the rest of this entry

Four Journalists Sue St. Louis County, St. Louis County Police and 20 Police Officers

Ferguson-protests-jourmalists-arrestedJournalists Ansgar Graw, Frank Hermann, Lukas Hermsmeier, and Ryan Devereaux, have filed a lawsuit that alleges battery by the police, false arrest and unreasonable search and seizure. The journalists were covering the protests in Ferguson, Missouri following the killing of Michael Brown.

“This unlawful conduct was undertaken with the intention of obstructing, chilling, deterring, and retaliating against Plaintiffs for engaging in constitutionally-protected speech, newsgathering, and recording of police activities,” the complaint reads.

Two of the journalists, Devereauz and Hermsmeier, allege that they were shot with rubber bullets after they had raised their hands in the air and identified themselves as members of the press.   Devereaux was hit once in the back and Hermsmeier was hit twice by the officers’ shots.  They were arrested and charged with refusal to disperse. They were left hand-cuffed in plastic ties for hours.  Allegations in the lawsuit include that the journalists still suffer physical injury from having their hands tied tight for hours. Read the rest of this entry

A Case that Can Set Precedent For Police Treatment Of The Mentally Ill

The Supreme Court for the United States takes case involving the San Francisco Police Department’s shooting of a mentally disabled woman.

We have read the headlines and tweets about members of law enforcement using excessive force, even killing, people who are mentally ill. Yesterday, I volunteered for a research project. I’m retired but now realize even more why I enjoy taking on these projects — not only does it help professionals who help others, but I always learn from them.

While conducting the research, I discovered the following. It’s good news in the sense that organizations across America are now seeking a decision from the highest court in the nation involving police and the mentally ill. It’s San Francisco vs. Sheehan, case number 13-1412.

Teresa_Sheehan_photo-cropped-400x279

Teresa Sheehan at Christmas dinner in 2014. (Courtesy of Frances Sheehan)

Theresa Sheehan lived in a group home in the Mission district and suffers from schizophrenia. In 2008, Theresa’s social worker contacted the police to carry out an involuntary psychiatric commitment. He alleged that Theresa threatened him with a knife.

Two cops arrived and entered Sheehan’s room. She threatened them as well. The two cops left and called for backup. However, before backup arrived, the officers broke down Theresa’s door, pepper sprayed her, and fired their guns 5 to 6 times. Theresa was shot but survived, needing two hip replacements as a result of being shot. Read the rest of this entry

Illinois Law Does Not Prohibit Recording On-Duty Law Enforcement

On Twitter, it started with circulating the headline of an article published on The Free Thought Project titled “Illinois Just Made it a Felony for Its Citizens to Record the Police and the Media is Silent.” The article claimed that Illinois passed a law making it a felony to record police officers. That is not factual. The emotional state of many Americans with the thought that a law prohibits the video recording of police officers using excessive force, was at the forefront of the headline that misrepresents the amended Illinois law.

Snopes has already printed about the apparent confusion of the law, which isn’t a new law at all but rather, an amendment to an existing law and does not prohibit the recording of on-duty police officers.

The Free Thought article states that the wording from the legislation is vague, and it included the following;

(a) Eavesdropping, for a first offense, is a Class 4 felony (from Ch. 38, par. 14-4) and, for a second or subsequent offense, is a Class 3 felony.

(b) The eavesdropping of an oral conversation or an electronic communication of any
law enforcement officer, State’s Attorney, Assistant State’s Attorney, the Attorney General, Assistant Attorney General, or a judge, while in the performance of his or her official duties, if not authorized by this Article or proper court order, is a Class 3 felony, and for a second or subsequent offenses, is a Class 2 felony.

Had readers clicked the link to the Bill, they would have read two words that should have stood out.  Those two words are;

  1. eavesdropping

  2. private

eavesdropping2When I read the first tweet reporting this, (and expressing disgust that Illinois would legislate such a law), I didn’t respond.  I didn’t respond because my first impression that anyone reading the word “eavesdropping” would understand its meaning.  I was wrong, not taking into consideration that people passing the tweet around are not residents of Illinois understanding how “eavesdropping” is defined in Illinois law. Read the rest of this entry

Department Of Justice Orders Ferguson Police To Stop Wearing ‘I Am Darren Wilson’ Bracelets

I also read that the DOJ informed the Ferguson police that not wearing their name tags was a violation of Ferguson Police Dept. rules, and to start wearing them.

The Fifth Column

State Troopers watching a protest in Ferguson, MO. | CREDIT: AP/CHARLIE RIEDEL

Think Progress

A Department of Justice letter sent to the Police Chief Tom Jackson of Ferguson, Missouri on Friday instructed all officers to stop wearing “I Am Darren Wilson” bracelets. Another letter issued on Tuesday ordered members of the police department to wear readable name plates, after officers were seen wearing unidentifiable tags or none at all.

Protests have not stopped in Ferguson since officer Darren Wilson shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown, who was unarmed, in August. And in response to civil unrest, which gained steam again after Brown’s memorial was burned to the ground on Tuesday, and the use of the slogan “I Am Mike Brown,” officers were photographed wearing the bracelets supporting the officer who killed him.

The DOJ letter sent to Jackson explained that the bracelets contributed to an “us versus them” mentality and…

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