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No Third Re-trial for Ray Tensing. Feds To Decide Whether Civil Rights Investigation Is Warranted

The New York Times Reports:

After two mistrials, Prosecutor, Joseph T. Deters, said his decision to drop the charges against Ray Tensing is because he spoke to the jurors. Those jurors told him that a unanimous conviction was not possible.  Federal prosecutors will now review the evidence to consider whether a civil rights investigation is warranted.

For other posts on this case, please see;

Tensing’s first trial;

Tensing’s Re-trial

 

Hung Jury In Trial of Former Garland Texas Officer

In December 2016, we followed the trials of Michael Slager and Dylann Roof.  There was also another trial.

patricktutermichaelvincentallen

Patrick Tuter, left. Michael Allen, right.

In August 2012, Officer Patrick Tuter of Garland, Texas led a vehicle chase of unarmed 25 year old Michael Allen.  Tuter fired at Michael 41 times, reloading several times and hitting Michael 3 times.   The Dallas County Medical Examiner’s Officer performed the autopsy and determined that Michael suffered gunshot wounds to his upper back, side, and left elbow.

Tuter’s official report was that he opened fired after Michael rammed a patrol car.  The dashboard video however, showed that it was Tuter’s patrol car that rammed into Michael’s truck.  Tuter fired his gun from the back, left-side of Michael’s truck.

Michael Allen’s body was pulled out of the cab of his truck by a K9 who chewed his face.

In March 2013, Tuter was fired for violating department policies on pursuits and use of force.  He had been on the force 7 years.

In November, 2013, a grand jury indicted Tuter on a manslaughter charge which if convicted, is punishable by up to 20 years in prison.  Read the rest of this entry

How The Jury In Porter’s Trial Voted

William G. Porter was the first of the Baltimore 6 to be tried in the death of Freddie Gray.  Judge Barry G. Williams declared a mistrial because the jury hung on all four charges.

The Baltimore Sun reports that legal experts say the information on how the jury voted is critical to understanding the process now playing out as prosecutors and Porter’s defense attorneys prepare for his scheduled retrial in June. The information also could help shape legal strategies in the pending cases against the other five police officers charged in Gray’s April arrest and death.

A gag order prevents prosecutors and  defense attorneys from discussing the case,but  one juror agreed to be interviewed.  That one juror said that some were driven to tears during deliberations.

The anonymous juror said that the jury changed their votes multiple times during deliberations.  For instance, a few more jurors wanted to convict Porter of manslaughter at the start of deliberations but changed their minds.

Officer Porter

William Porter

The jury consisted of 4 black women, 3 black men, 3 white women, and 2 white men.  The only juror identified is Susan Elgin, an attorney.

The six police officers charged in Gray’s arrest and death have all pleaded not guilty. Four have been suspended without pay; the other two who only face misdemeanors are suspended with pay.

 


Read the rest of this entry

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