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An Uneasy And Fearful Society – A Comment By Two Sides To A Story

In response to “Silence and Shame after Charleston,” written by Padre Steve’s World that I reblogged, Two Sides To A Story commented.  It is a profound comment.  She gave me permission to post it separately.

Written by Two Sides To A Story

Heartbreaking subject. But despite public figures avoiding the topic in order to not offend supporters, there’s still lots of fertile discussion online in blogs like yours and in social media. And there’s plenty of cyber-fistfights and name-slinging too, so proceed with caution!

The people that disturb me as much as outright racists are a surprising number of people who think they’re not racist but deny that there’s a problem any more – they’re “sick of racism” and so they think never mentioning race fixes the situation despite the facts. Basically they seem invested in denying that white privilege exists in spite of how challenging white lives are, and that a great deal of racism is embedded in our institutions and justice system. We’re seeing the latter as a light has been shined on law enforcement to reveal corruption and racism within the ranks. Read the rest of this entry

How To Fix The Broken Police Culture

Police culture. The first time I heard that term was in an article written by Brian Willis titled “7 reasons the police culture is broken (and how to fix it)”, published on policeone.com. Brian Willis is Deputy Executive Director for the International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association (ILEETA), He was once a full time police officer from 1979 to 2004 with the Calgary Police Service. He also has a website.

chokeNot long ago, a friend and I talked about the hiring and training of police. We spoke about the draft. You might ask, what does the draft have to do with the police?  My son served 12 years in the Armed Forces. He worked and attended college before joining the military.  When his second enlistment was completed, he received letters from law enforcement agencies. Some were local and others were from other states. There was active recruitment of military personnel to apply for positions in law enforcement and border patrol. My son was not a combat enlistment, but the recruitment letters for “combat veterans” kept coming.

In wars before Viet Nam, the enemy was easily recognizable by uniform. It was army against army.  In wars since then, and particularly starting with Persian Gulf II, the enemy can look like, and can be, a civilian.

Rather than wars being country against country, it is “them against us.” Read the rest of this entry

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