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Anti-violence protesters block major freeway in Chicago

Trump Got It All Wrong … Again

This country was built on protests, not because people hate the country, but because they love this country and expect for it to keep its promises to everyone. Things cannot be fixed until it is admitted that they are broken.

Kneeling is both a sign of respect and a sign of sympathy. I can kneel to say, “I respect the flag, but the country it represents, my country, is sick. It needs healing. I do not kneel to disrespect, but kneel FOR all of the rights that this country promises to be administered fairly and equally to all of its citizens.”

I kneel to cry. The President of our country has no shame in saying “Son of bitch.”. I cry for him. I cry for our country. I am too weak from crying to stand.

Filosofa's Word

Let’s be perfectly clear on something here.  It is NOT against any law to sit, kneel, or even lie prone while the Star Spangled Banner is being played.  It is everyone’s right to do as they will.  According to Title 36 (section 171) of the United States Code, “During rendition of the national anthem when the flag is displayed, all present except those in (military) uniform should stand at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart …”  ‘Should’ does not equate to ‘must’, and there are neither penalties nor punishment for failing to do so.  It is not a law.

Before a pre-season game in 2016, Colin Kaepernick sat down, actually took to one knee, as opposed to the tradition of standing, during the playing of “The Star-Spangled Banner”. During a post-game interview, he explained his position stating, “I am not going to stand…

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The 10 Most Under-reported Black Stories of 2015

Ebony has published “The 10 Most Underreported Black Stories of 2015.   The list is long, so the following are several that I found quite interesting – things I did not know.

Black Lives Matter throws support behind police shooting victim, Zachary Hammond, who was White.

Zachary HammondThe Black Lives Matter movement is serious about the message that police violence is epidemic in America. So race didn’t factor in when they took up the cause of Zachary Hammond, an unarmed, White 19-year-old South Carolina man, who was shot to death by an officer on July 26, 2015 in Seneca, South Carolina.  Black Lives Matter publicly cried out for justice for Hammond, just as they did for so many other cases where Blacks were killed by cops. And just like so many others, the officer in Hammond’s case was not charged. While his family has vowed to continue to fight for justice,  Black Lives Matter has included Hammond’s name in the long list of victims of excessive police brutality.

As Lincoln Blades commented in The Grio, acknowledging the systemic causes of Hammond’s death means “admitting that black folks haven’t been lying or exaggerating when we’ve said that there is a real problem with policing in America.”


Bomb explodes outside Colorado Springs NAACP office Read the rest of this entry

10 things you need to know today: December 21, 2014

The Fifth Column

The Week

A gunman kills two NYC police officers, Obama says the Sony hack is not an act of war, and more.

1. Gunman kills two NYC cops in ambush shooting
A lone gunman on Saturday shot and killed two New York City police officers in Brooklyn before taking his own life in an armed standoff. The shooter, 28-year-old Ismaaiyl Brinsley, is believed to have killed his ex-girlfriend in Baltimore earlier Saturday before heading north and vowing on social media to kill police officers, too. Police said Brinsley killed officers Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos while they sat in a parked squad car, and then fled into a nearby subway station where he shot himself. Police Commissioner William Bratton called the attack an assassination, saying the officers were “targeted for their uniform and for the responsibility they embraced to keep the people of this city safe.” [The New York…

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The Gift of Gil Scott Heron – Seeing the Present In The Past

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Gil Scott Heron, Reflections

Johannesburg” and “Gun” are the first songs I remember hearing by Gil Scott Heron. That was in the mid 1970’s. I’ve often listened to the vinyl that I still have of Gil. He was the voice of protest, the voice of reason, the teacher of truth.   Many of his lyrics written in the 1970’s and 1980’s, are true today.

Like many albums of that time, one song was more than 12 minutes.  It was not merely listening music; it was conversation  music.

Gilbert “Gil” Scott-Heron (April 1, 1949 – May 27, 2011) was more of a poet than a singer. Born in Chicago, Illinois, Gil’s mother was Bobbie Scott-Heron, who was an opera singer with the New York Oratorio Society. His dad, Gil Heron, was nicknamed the “Black Arrow.” He was a Jamaican football player in the 1950’s and the first Black man to play for the Celtic Football Club in Glasgow.

As a teen, Gil earned a full scholarship to the private, prestigious Fieldston School in New York. He was one of five black students at the school and his experience lead to his boldness, which became his hallmark in poetry and song. The Revolution Will Not Be Televised is one of Gil’s most popular songs, recorded by others, including LaBelle.  He used the words “not televised” in many of his other songs.  As Gil would have his listeners know, what the media reports is limited to who they interview; what they are told.  If you want to know the truth, you have to live it. Read the rest of this entry

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