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How Oppression Shows Its Face In The Business Of Hair Braiding

Peaches, before Bo Derek

When I watched the video below, it reminded me of when I was a little girl.  In the summer, people sat on their front porches.  One of the pastimes that girls did was braid hair. It ranged from hanging braided styles to corn rows.

Back then before hair relaxers, I suspect that almost any Black woman or girl will tell us that after their hair was washed, it was braided, in small portions, to allow it to dry and not tangle.   After it dried, it could be combed out into another braided style, or straightened with a “straightening comb.”

In 1979, the movie “10” was released, and suddenly Caucasians who were unfamiliar with African cultur, thought that Bo Derek’s cornrows was an original style.  At least a year before Bo Derek appeared on screen with cornrows, Linda Greene appeared as “Peaches” of the duo, Peaches and Herb, with decorated cornrows.

Bo Derek

Hair braiding has been practiced for centuries in African communities, and by African-Americans. It doesn’t require any chemicals, hair dyes or cutting.

Along with American Blacks, some sisters from Africa came to America and started home businesses cornrowing.  They also braid with extensions.  Depending on the style, (and if the customer brought their own “ponytails” with them to use for extensions), the price could range anywhere from $50 to a $150.00 dollars – at least, in my neck of the woods.  It’s a style that lasts 2 to 3 months, depending on how fast the customer’s hair grows.

Now, there are 13 states that have laws forbidding the braiding of hair for money without a cosmetology license.  There are hefty fines if anyone is caught charging money for braiding hair without a cosmetology license. Read the rest of this entry

The Stars and Bars…

Walmart Aims To End Sale Of Confederate Flag Merchandise, Virginia & Mississippi Follow South Carolina’s Lead

Yes! Get rid of it.

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