Blog Archives

Distrust — Why People Are Demonstrating

If you’re like me, since the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis Cop Derek Chauvin, you’ve spent hours watching demonstrators in the streets of major cities.  I was doing that yesterday when seeing signs carried by demonstrators. Some signs had names of others killed by police.  One name struck me.  That name is Jose Campos Torres.

Kare reports the following:

MINNEAPOLIS — United States Attorney Erica Macdonald says they’re conducting a “robust and meticulous” criminal investigation into the police-related death of George Floyd.In a press conference Thursday evening, Macdonald said that the Department of Justice has made the investigation into George Floyd’s death a top priority.

“We have assigned the highest of the high in my office to investigate and look at the case,” Macdonald said. “FBI, likewise, has assigned their experienced law enforcement officers to conduct the investigation.” She added that President Donald Trump and Attorney General William Barr are “directly and actively monitoring the investigation.”

If people did not trust that system before MacDonald spoke, they certainly did not — cannot trust it after she stated that Donald Trump and Bill Barr are “directly and actively monitoring the investigation”.  For some, the distrust was planted in 1977 when Jose Campos Torres was killed by Houston police officers, and how that system punched justice in the face.

On October 7, 2015,  I published an Open Discussion post.  In that post, I wrote about Jose Campos Torres.  Seeing his name yesterday on a sign carried by a demonstrator inspires me to share with others that the people on the streets are not only protesting the death of George Floyd.  They are also demonstrating against a system of empty promises that has often laughed in our faces because they have the authority to do so.   The following is an excerpt from that post.

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Open (Any) Discussion

Caterpillars, moths, butterflies, and all creatures great and small,

ToothacheI have to take a break and hope to be back blogging by the beginning of next week. Although I’ll be checking in at least once a day, I don’t plan on writing a post. Along with medical lab tests, I have to find a dentist because a filling just came out and I want to have it taken care of before the nerve reminds me of its existence.

Here’s a shout-out and hugs to new subscribed followers and participants. Thanks so much for your support.

 

New Blog launched in July 2015.

If you’re interested in our experience with cyber-extortionists, or have experiences of your own with cyber-harassers, you might want to visit the blog flightattendantfailures.  The reason for the blog title is on the “About” page. I began documenting the history and have also reblogged at least one very good article on the study of internet trolls. I would appreciate your reading and input.

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This is an open discussion thread. Feel free to discuss whatever is on your mind, share videos and links to articles for discussion.

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The Gift of Gil Scott Heron – Seeing the Present In The Past

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Gil Scott Heron, Reflections

Johannesburg” and “Gun” are the first songs I remember hearing by Gil Scott Heron. That was in the mid 1970’s. I’ve often listened to the vinyl that I still have of Gil. He was the voice of protest, the voice of reason, the teacher of truth.   Many of his lyrics written in the 1970’s and 1980’s, are true today.

Like many albums of that time, one song was more than 12 minutes.  It was not merely listening music; it was conversation  music.

Gilbert “Gil” Scott-Heron (April 1, 1949 – May 27, 2011) was more of a poet than a singer. Born in Chicago, Illinois, Gil’s mother was Bobbie Scott-Heron, who was an opera singer with the New York Oratorio Society. His dad, Gil Heron, was nicknamed the “Black Arrow.” He was a Jamaican football player in the 1950’s and the first Black man to play for the Celtic Football Club in Glasgow.

As a teen, Gil earned a full scholarship to the private, prestigious Fieldston School in New York. He was one of five black students at the school and his experience lead to his boldness, which became his hallmark in poetry and song. The Revolution Will Not Be Televised is one of Gil’s most popular songs, recorded by others, including LaBelle.  He used the words “not televised” in many of his other songs.  As Gil would have his listeners know, what the media reports is limited to who they interview; what they are told.  If you want to know the truth, you have to live it. Read the rest of this entry

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