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“We Fight for Men and Women Whose Poetry has Not Yet Been Written…” Remembering Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts 

I learned of the 54th Regiment by watching the movie “Glory.” It was so interesting that I then purchased a book about it. Thanks for this post.

Padre Steve's World...Musings of a Progressive Realist in Wonderland


Friends of Padre Steve’s World,

When it learned that the Federal Government was recruiting African Americans, both free men and former slaves as soldiers the Confederate Congress issued this proclamation:

“Any negro taken in arms against the Confederacy will immediately be returned to a state of slavery. Any negro taken in Federal uniform will be summarily put to death. Any white officer taken in command of negro troops shall be deemed as inciting servile insurrection and shall likewise be put to death.”

Those who doubt that the leaders of the Confederacy fought the war for any “state right” other than the maintenance and expansion of slavery needs to look at the actions and words of that racist republic.


One hundred and fifty-four years ago today one of those African American regiments went into action against the Confederate works at Battery Wagner, outside of Charleston, South Carolina. The 54th was raised…

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Sunday Song – Glory

Glory” is a song written and performed by Common and John Legend.  It was the theme song from the 2013 movie Selma, which is about the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery Alabama.  Glory won the 2015 Academy Award for Best Original Song, and a Grammy at the 58th Annual Grammy Awards.

 

 

 

JOHN LEGEND & COMMON 2015 OSCARS

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After seeing this performance of “Glory” from the movie Selma by John Legend & Common at the 2015 Oscars, I simply felt numb.  Their performance was the highlight of the night and brought many audience members to tears.  And then… the acceptance speeches afterwards for Best Song were poignant.  Their words help to put a punctuation mark  on BLACK HISTORY MONTH and the continued struggle…

Common’s speech:

“The spirit of this bridge connects the kid from the south side of Chicago, dreaming of a better life, to those in France standing up for their freedom of expression, to those in Hong Kong, protesting for democracy,” he said. “This bridge was built on hope, welded with compassion and elevated with love for all human beings.”

John Legend added the following:

“We say that Selma is now, because the struggle for justice is right now,” he said. “We know that the Voting…

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