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The Day in a Quote

Haha! Or if issuing a marriage license to a same sex couple means participating in or contributing to sin, or a Christian  issuing a gun license to someone who uses it to commit murder contributes to that sin.

The Last Of The Millenniums

day7

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10 things you need to know today: August 22, 2014

Good morning caterpillars, butterflies, moths, and all creatures great and small.  Here’s 10 Things You Need To Know Today, courtesy of The Fifth Column.

The Fifth Column

The National Guard withdraw from Ferguson.  The National Guard withdraw from Ferguson. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

The Week

National Guard begins withdrawing from Ferguson, a judge strikes down Florida’s gay-marriage ban, and more

1. Nixon pulls National Guard from Ferguson as protests grow calmer
Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon (D) announced Thursday that National Guard troops would begin withdrawing from Ferguson after two days of easing tensions there. Nixon said the troops had helped restore calm following sometimes violent protests over the killing of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teen, by a white policeman on Aug. 9. Attorney General Eric Holder visited the St. Louis suburb on Wednesday and promised a fair investigation. [The New York Times]

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2. Judge rules Florida’s gay-marriage ban unconstitutional
A federal judge in Florida declared the state’s same-sex marriage ban unconstitutional on Thursday. U.S District Judge Robert L. Hinkle ordered the state to allow same-sex marriages and to recognize legal…

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10 things you need to know today: July 24, 2014

Hurray for Colorado. It seems to be the only good news lately. Thanks for keeping us up-to-date.

The Fifth Column

Joseph Rudolph Wood's execution took nearly two hours.  Joseph Rudolph Wood’s execution took nearly two hours. (AP Photo/Arizona Department of Corrections)

The Eighth Amendment (Amendment VIII) to the United States Constitution is the part of the United States Bill of Rights (ratified December 15, 1791[1]) prohibiting the federal governmentfrom imposing excessive bail, excessive fines or cruel and unusual punishments, including torture. 
The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that this amendment's Cruel and Unusual Punishment Clause also applies to the states. The phrases in this amendment originated in the English Bill of Rights of 1689. ~ Wikipedia

The Week

Arizona is accused of botching an execution, the FAA lifts a ban on flights to Israel, and more

1. Arizona inmate gasps for 90 minutes during execution
Arizona inmate Joseph Wood gasped for breath for an hour and a half before being pronounced dead by lethal injection on Wednesday. Wood’s…

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10 things you need to know today: June 26, 2014

The Fifth Column

Eyes on the prize. Eyes on the prize. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The Week

Boehner says the GOP will sue Obama, the Supreme Court blocks warrantless cellphone searches, and more

1. Republicans threaten to sue Obama
House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) said lawmakers would vote next month on authorizing alawsuit against President Obama because they believe he has failed to carry out Congress’ laws on everything from health care to energy to foreign policy. The White House said it was “completely confident” Obama had always acted within his authority. Rep. Steve Israel (D-N.Y.) called the move a “desperate political stunt” to rile up the GOP base. [BBC News]

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2. Supreme Court protects cellphones from warrantless searches
The Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that police cannot search the cellphone of an arrested suspect without a warrant. The sweeping, 9-0 decision marked a major victory for privacy advocates. Chief Justice John Roberts said it…

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10 things you need to know today: May 14, 2014

There are very important stories today. Thanks for putting them together.

My heart goes out to the families of those killed in the mine.

Happy to hear that there is a stay of execution for Robert Campbell. There is no “humane” way of killing a human, and the mentally challenged should not be executed.

The Judge in Idaho did the right thing, IMO, to strike down that state’s amendment banning same-sex marriage.

The Fifth Column

The UN's special envoy to Syria resigned Tuesday.   The UN’s special envoy to Syria resigned Tuesday. AP Photo

The Week

The U.N.’s Syria peace envoy gives up, a judge strikes down Idaho’s gay marriage ban, and more

1. U.N. Syria envoy Brahimi steps down
The United Nations’ envoy in Syria, Lakhdar Brahimi, quit on Tuesday, saying he was frustrated with the lack of progress in negotiations to end the country’s three-year civil war. “It’s very sad that I leave this position and leave Syria behind in such a bad state,” Brahimi said. In another setback, France’s top diplomat said evidence indicated Syria had used chemical weapons a dozen times since signing a treaty banning them. [The New York Times]

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2. Judge strikes down Idaho’s constitutional amendment banning gay marriage
U.S. Magistrate Judge Candy Dale late Tuesday ruled that Idaho’s 2006 ban on same-sex marriagewas unconstitutional, the latest in a string of court victories…

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