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The Slow Integration of Major League Baseball

“Racism still exists, but one day thanks to the efforts of the early ball-players as well as pioneers like President Obama, and the undying commitment of decent Americans to accept people regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, or even sexual orientation, we will see a new birth of freedom.”

I truly hope so.

Padre Steve's World...Musings of a Progressive Realist in Wonderland

Jackie Robinson Shaking Branch Rickey's Hand

Friends of Padre Steve’s World,

Back in 1947 Branch Rickey told Jackie Robinson, “Jackie, we’ve got no army. There’s virtually nobody on our side. No owners, no umpires, very few newspapermen. And I’m afraid that many fans will be hostile. We’ll be in a tough position. We can win only if we can convince the world that I’m doing this because you’re a great ballplayer, a fine gentleman.”

My friends, last week pitchers and catchers reported to their teams for the 2016 Baseball Spring Training, and it is time to reflect again on how Branch Rickey’s signing of Jackie Robinson helped advance the Civil Rights of Blacks in the United States. What Rickey did was a watershed, and though it took time for every team in the Major Leagues to integrate, the last being the Boston Red Sox in 1959, a dozen years after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier.

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Chicago Cops Coach Youth Baseball League On South Side To Broker Peace

The best to them!

The Chicago Defender

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At a time when interactions between African-Americans and police are fraught with tension over allegations of excessive force by cops across the nation, a team of Chicago officers are making efforts to improve relations with youth on the city?s South Side, reportsThe Huffington Post.

The Englewood Police Youth Baseball League hopes the sport of baseball will help combat violence by uniting athletes in Englewood?one of the city?s most violent communities?with mentors from the police department, notes the report.

?Showing them that police are human, that we?re their friend, that they are safe around us. That?s an extension of being a police officer,? Angela Wormley, police officer and volunteer coach, told the news outlet.

The league launched in May as part of a partnership with Get In Chicago, a program that works to eliminate juvenile violence, and the community welfare organization Teamwork Englewood…

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