Mohamed Noor Sentenced to 12.5 Years For Killing Justine Damond

Justine Damond

On June 7, 2019, former Minneapolis police officer Mohamed Noor was sentenced to 12 1/2 years for killing Justine Damond.

In April, Noor was found guilty of third-degree murder and manslaughter. He was found not guilty second-degree murder.

 

ABC  news reports

Speaking in court before the sentence was read, Noor said that he had felt “fear” as he pulled the trigger. But when he saw Ruszczyk Damond on the ground, “I knew in an instant that I was wrong.”

“I caused this tragedy and it is my burden,” he said. “I wish though that I could relieve that burden others feel from the loss that I caused. I cannot and that is a troubling reality for me. I will think about Ms. Ruszczyk and her family forever. The only thing I can do is try to live my life in a good way going forward.”

Justine had called 911 after hearing screams in the back of the building where she lived.  She waited for the police and approached the police car when it arrived.  She was unarmed.  Noor shot Justine through the open driver’s side window, although he was sitting in the passenger’s seat and his partner did not see any threat.   Justine was in her pajamas.

Fox News reports;

“The defendant fired his gun over the body of his partner,” Lofton told the court at sentencing. “He did that in a residential neighborhood. He did that without saying a word. He did that despite Ms. Rusczyzk not saying a word. He did that despite the fact that she had nothing in her hands but a cell phone.”

 

Posted on 06/11/2019, in Cases, Justine Damond and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 5 Comments.

  1. This case just shows the blatant hypocrisy about police brutality. Officer Noor is the first cop to claim he “feared for his life” and went to jail for it.

    Like

    • Ospreyshire,
      What I noticed about the prosecution of this case is that the prosecutors introduced a different standard to the jury. It’s the standard that I’ve said all along should be used in cases when law enforcement is charged with an on-duty shooting. They used the standard of what a reasonable officer would have done, and that is likened to the standard of abuse of discretion. The beyond a reasonable doubt standard does not, has never, applied to law enforcement officers. There is no doubt in those cases that an officer fired the fatal bullet. Their defense has always been that they had a duty to stop the threat, or feared for their life or the life of their partner.

      In this case, although Noor claimed that he feared for his life, the jury found that his fear was not reasonable. He shot pass his partner, who felt no fear or need to pull his weapon. Now, had it been found that Damond was armed, the case might have gone a different way.

      Now that the State of Minnesota has opened the path for the abuse of discretion standard, here’s hoping that prosecutors in other states do the same.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Good points and I noticed that different standard, too. Then again, this is the same police unit who was involved in the death of Philando Castille which was unjustified and there was camera footage from the dashcam and Facebook Live.

        Definitely, but I seriously doubt he wouldv’e gotten off even if she was armed. I would think the NRA would campaign against them if that happened.

        Sure and I hope there won’t be any double standards when it comes to similar cases.

        Like

        • Ospreshire,
          I also hope that double standards will be eliminated, but honestly, I don’t see that coming. The color of skin has been an issue in America since the time that the first slave ships landed on its shores. Sadly, there are still people who sit on juries and judge based on that rather than facts and law. Then too, there are people who will always justify whatever a person with a badge and a gun did regardless of the color of the victim or officer on trial.

          We still have a long way to go, so it seems.

          Liked by 1 person

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