St. Louis Detective and Prosecutor Sentenced By Federal Court

Let’s see if we can figure this out, and why it takes digging into several media sources to get all of the details.  Seriously, my research about this case took me back to July 2014, and online news sources St. Louis Today, Fox news, and the Washington Times.

On July 22, 2014, St. Louis, MO police detective Thomas A. Carroll assaulted handcuffed suspect, Michael Waller.  He didn’t report it to superiors and assisted in filing charges against Waller.

carroll-e1469730847325

Thomas A. Carroll (photo by J.B. Forbes)

After 25 years on the job, Carroll was suspended without pay in late July 2014 amid ongoing criminal and internal investigations that is said to have involved the FBI.  Subsequently, Carroll retired.  Internal affairs charged Carroll with failure to follow an order.

Michael Waller was charged on July 23, 2014 with receiving stolen property and fraudulent use of a credit card, along with an escape charge relative to resisting arrest.  He was allegedly in possession of a stolen credit card that belonged to Carroll’s daughter.  His booking photo shows that he had a black-eye.

Two St. Louis prosecutors, Bliss Worrell and Katherine Dierdorf, were forced to leave their jobs because of their knowledge of events, and the circumstances related to charging Waller.  There was investigation that Carroll was giving prosecutors unauthorized ride-alongs that included allowing them to use his taser on suspects.  The same day that Worrell and Dierdorf left their jobs, the charges against Waller were dismissed.

579791ed3d81b.image

Michael Waller

In October 2015, former prosecutor Worrell pleaded guilty to a felony charge of misprision of a felony.  In January 2016, Worrell’s license to practice law was temporary suspended.  The suspension is in place pending the outcome of disciplinary proceedings by the Missouri Supreme Court’s Office of Chief Disciplinary Counsel.

Last week, Bliss Worrell was sentenced to 18 months of probation and 140 hours of community service.

Thomas A. Carroll, the former city police detective, was charged with the federal offense of violating Waller’s civil rights. On Wednesday, July 27, 2016, Carroll was sentenced to 52 months in federal prison after a two-day hearing detailing Worrell’s and Dierdorf’s cover-ups.

According to the DOJ’s press release;

“It’s a sad day when a uniformed police officer is sent to prison for violating the constitutional rights of a citizen,” said U.S. Attorney Dickinson.  “No one is above the law, and no one has the right to take the law into their own hands.  Now this disgraced officer will face the consequences of his violent crime.  Our system of justice will hold him accountable for his betrayal of the community he swore to protect and serve.”

Before sentencing, Federal court Judge Autrey reminded Carroll that even someone possessing his daughter’s stolen credit card has civil rights.

St. Louis Today reports that Katie Dierdorf’s  license to practice law is listed as inactive in Missouri, but active in Colorado where she is a public defender.

As Baltimore, Maryland State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby stated last week when announcing that charges against the remaining Baltimore 6 charged in the death of Freddie Gray were dismissed,;

“As you can see, whether investigating, interrogating, testifying, cooperating, or even complying with the state, we all bore witness to an inherent bias that is the direct result of when police police themselves.”

It’s been a year since the Department of Justice launched a federal civil rights investigation of the Baltimore Police Department.   In the case in St. Louis, Michael Waller who was handcuffed when beaten, lived to testify what happened to him that violated his civil rights.  Freddie Gray, who was also handcuffed and shackled while in the police van ended up with 80 percent of his spine severed.  He is dead.  The DOJ might not get a result of charges, convictions, and sentencing of anyone for violating Freddie’s civil rights because he cannot testify on his own behalf.

We’ll wait and see how the system works.

Posted on 08/02/2016, in Cases, civil rights, Cops Gone Wild, Department of Justice, Trial Videos and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 23 Comments.

  1. Finally, the DOJ acted. I had been questioning, just what it would take to have the DOJ decide to step up to the plate to take action? The Freddie Gray case is a situation where the young, inexperienced prosecutor tried to do what is right but she was going against a well entrenched local system which worked against a successful prosecution.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Hey Gronda! I think what is required is that the defendants agree to a plea deal, and the victim is alive to testify. Regarding the trials of the officers charged with the death of Freddie, it was Judge Williams who decided that their negligence was civil and not criminal. Remember, the first trial resulted in a hung jury. The officers thereafter officers opted for a bench trial to get the results they wanted which was a judge deciding on a standard of abuse of discretion.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. yahtzeebutterfly

    Thanks for your excellent article, Xena. I would not have known about this case, the officer, or the two prosecutors had it not been for your great research here.

    “St. Louis Today reports that Katie Dierdorf’s license to practice law is listed as inactive in Missouri, but active in Colorado where she is a public defender.”

    In my opinion, it is not right for Dierdorf to be allowed to practice law anywhere.

    The DOJ needs to give the same type of justice to Freddie Gray as it gave to Michael Waller because BLACK LIVES MATTER, too!!!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Hey Yahtzee, and thanks for your kind words. Regarding Dierdorf, going from a prosecutor to a public defender has to weigh on her career.

      I totally agree with your comment about Freddie Gray and Black Lives Matter.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. yahtzeebutterfly

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m waiting to see if they have body cam video or eyewitnesses before commenting on the mom in Baltimore killed by police. There was suppose to have been an hour long standoff with her holding what was described as a “long gun.” Of course, that’s the officers’ version and we know their version is not always the truth.

      But, the fact that White mass murderers at taken alive (unless they kill themselves) when Blacks are not demonstrates the bias in the system.

      Liked by 1 person

      • long gun OR a mop or broom?…..already known that a white toy truck was claimed to be a gun in miami

        Liked by 2 people

        • Hey Bill! Know what? You make an excellent point.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Baltimore County has released some information.

          Turns out that none of the officers had body cams. They reported that during the standoff, Korryn Gaines was posting video of what was happening on her Facebook and Instagram accounts.

          Like

          • yahtzeebutterfly

            Looked as if there was a camera on the helmet of the officer in this video.

            It is as if the officer is standing in such a way as to get a video for the other officers to see where Korryn and her son were.

            Check the left side of the officer’s helmet at timestamp 0:29 of this video that Shaun King tweeted:

            Liked by 1 person

            • I’m unsure if that’s a camera or a light on the helmet. I have a similar cap with a light on front. One push of a button, the light comes on and I can see if there are any critters wondering around in the darkness. 🙂

              All joking aside though, I read the report about why she was stopped for a traffic violation, and that makes me tremble. It’s because what she had instead of a license plate is classic sovereign citizen. For sometime now I’ve feared that sovereign citizens would infiltrate Black Lives Matter as a means to turn them against the government and to spread their mumbo-jumbo.

              Liked by 1 person

            • yahtzeebutterfly

              Oh my.

              Liked by 1 person

      • yahtzeebutterfly

        From the cases (and videos) that I have seen, law enforcement actions/justice is very uneven in our country when it comes to what Whites experience/receive vs the what Blacks experience/receive.

        Like

  4. “The DOJ needs to give the same type of justice to Freddie Gray as it gave to Michael Waller because BLACK LIVES MATTER, too!!!”

    You were reading my mind.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. yahtzeebutterfly

    From the DOJ press release that you quoted in your article:

    “No one is above the law, and no one has the right to take the law into their own hands. Now this disgraced officer will face the consequences of his violent crime. Our system of justice will hold him accountable for his betrayal of the community he swore to protect and serve.”

    I find it interesting that the DOJ can boldly state this which is what protestors are demanding when they witness an injustice. I have been thinking of the signs that protestors have held at rallies as they have begged for justice. One that comes to my mind:

    Liked by 1 person

%d bloggers like this: