Rapist Cop Found Guilty

People were concerned when the jury took more than three days to deliberate. Our own Mindyme commented about that earlier. I half-jokingly said that Daniel Holtzclaw was charged with 36 felonies, so it might take the jury 36 days to reach a verdict. Holtzclaw was charged with 36 counts of rape, forcible oral sodomy, burglary and other charges.

Shortly after 9 p.m. ET this evening, the jury returned guilty verdicts. It was their fourth day of deliberations. Holtzclaw was not found guilty on some counts, but he was found guilty of enough counts to spend the rest of his life in prison. Holtzclaw is 28 years old.

Daniel-Holtzclaw

Daniel Holtzclaw

Daniel Holtzclaw was an Oklahoma City police officer who was charged with sexually assaulting 13 women over a 7 month period. The women ranged in age from 17 to 57. It was after the eldest victim came forward that others did also, saying that they had remained silent out of fear of retribution. Holtzclaw was placed on administrative leave in January 2015 when GPS tracking devices were used to corroborate the victims’ stories.

There was some racial controversy. Of the 13 victims, 12 are Black. Oklahoma City is reported to have a 40 percent minority population, but the chose jurors, 8 men and 4 women, were all White.

Victims gave testimony describing Holtzclaw’s acts which I will not repeat here. They were deplorable and you can read about their testimonies on News 9.

Holtzclaw hung his head and began sobbing and rocking back and forth as the verdicts were read. His formal sentencing is set for January 21, 2016.

 

 

 

 

Posted on 12/10/2015, in Cases, Cops Gone Wild and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 64 Comments.

  1. How dare he cry now. What he did was like the worst thing he could – using his power and selecting those he knew were the most vulnerable. He systematically targeted black women with prior criminal records and substance abuse problems because he thought they wouldn’t be believed if they reported the assaults.

    This is one of those times I truly wish I did believe in hell so I could say, “May he rot in hell” and have it mean something.

    Liked by 8 people

    • Hey Rachael,
      Well, he has made his own hell.

      His tears are probably because he thought he could continue and get away with sexually violating women. I can’t help but wonder what his personal life is/was like.

      Liked by 8 people

    • yahtzeebutterfly

      Just seeing him shaking uncontrollably before the verdict and then sobbing during the guilty counts shows that his feelings are all about himself.

      Here is a man who was unmerciful toward his victims and unconcerned about the suffering he caused them who seems now to be crying for himself but not out of remorse.

      His days of getting “pleasure” by using power and authority over the helpless are over. There is no pleasure in his future.

      I hurt and pray for the women he mercilessly abused and harmed. I can’t imagine the pain and fear that they have endured.

      Liked by 7 people

  2. Reblogged this on Let Our Voices Echo and commented:
    Crying Little Bitch… Even running concurrently and possibly only serving 1/3 time he’ll still, do an absolute minimum of 10 years… Too bad, so sad. NOT.

    Liked by 7 people

  3. Crying Little Bitch… Even running concurrently and possibly only serving 1/3 time he’ll still, do an absolute minimum of 10 years… Too bad, so sad. NOT.

    Liked by 7 people

  4. He was crying like a baby… I’m sure he wasn’t crying when he was doing his deeds… Karma is tough…

    Liked by 8 people

  5. Like

  6. Liked by 2 people

  7. yahtzeebutterfly

    My deep wish for the world:

    May all hearts follow the Golden Rule and be filled with empathy, compassion and kindness.

    Liked by 5 people

  8. This is every woman’s nightmare. He will get his comeuppance in prison.

    Liked by 6 people

  9. I involuntarily giggled while watching him cry in front of the judge. I seem to remember his sister having a FB page supporting him.

    Liked by 4 people

  10. They must know me there, I’m not allowed to comment

    https://www.facebook.com/Justice-for-Daniel-Holtzclaw-1509057449330490/?fref=ts

    Liked by 3 people

    • Mindyme,
      I just went over that page briefly, and it appears that the sister was condemning the women as if to say that they deserved to have their bodies violated. I hope that she stays safe and is never sexually assaulted.

      Liked by 4 people

  11. yahtzeebutterfly

    Happening now:

    “Live stream: Daniel Holtzclaw victims, attorneys speak to media at Oklahoma County Courthouse”
    http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/state/live-stream-daniel-holtzclaw-victims-attorneys-speak-to-media-at/article_76a20f01-959c-5f66-b43d-74623d70c5d1.html

    Liked by 3 people

    • So he was found not guilty on the rape charges for 5 of the victims. I’ll have to figure out if he was convicted of other charges for those 5.

      Liked by 2 people

      • It was such a long trial, with so many witness, that the testimony of each one would have to be heard and weighed in order to hear/see what the jurors saw/heard. Apparently, the jury thought that some of the women were not credible or not completely honest while others were.

        Liked by 2 people

  12. First he is a predator. Second he committed acts these women may never recover from. Third he deserves to be in jail for the rest of his life. Hugs, Barbara

    Liked by 5 people

    • Hey Barbara! Excellent comment. In the video I posted of two victims speaking, the oldest victim, who was also the first to come forth, said that she went to counseling and suffered a stroke. That is what people should understand that rape is not about sex. There is something in the mind of the rapist that seeks to violate and control their victims.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Two victims address the media.

    Liked by 2 people

    • That’s the most incredible video I’ve seen in awhile. Ever Since I’ve seen snippets of victims testimony I can’t help but wonder if I could’ve told police much less testified in front of all those ppl at a trial. Their stories are so horrific, so incredibly humiliating, so traumatizing, I don’t know if I would’ve been brave enough. Thank god for those hero’s. Thank god for the ppl who stood by them & supported them through this.

      State needs to provide every single one of the victims with enough money and resourses to get the support, therapy & comfort they deserve for the rest of their lives.
      I also think the state should get down on their knees and thank the victims for coming forward and getting that scum off the street. Who knows how many other victims are out there, but thanks to these women & young girl, at least he won’t be attacking anyone else.

      I’m so grateful for that jury, except for the counts they didn’t convict, they did do something that most juries refuse to do, they rightly convicted a police officer of the crimes he clearly committed.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Keep trying to post something must be wrong w/my app.

      Like

  14. Two sides to a story

    Now if only the courts would get serious about convicting law enforcement officers for brutality. And the system needs special prisons for cops, like military prisons.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Two sides,
      I’m pondering your suggestion. My first thought is that those who commit criminal acts should not be treated differently. My second thought is that those under the authority of others (such as in the military or police forces) should have separate prisons. However, my third thought is that those in the military who are put in brigs are subject to military courts. One of the problems we have today in many jurisdictions is that law enforcement is investigated by members of law enforcement who never hold them accountable.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Two sides to a story

        I’m all for community oversight of police departments, but of course there has to be some way to give that oversight teeth! Certainly cops should be handled by the justice system and not through internal investigations that absolve everyone. I’m thinking perhaps a military type court and prison system for LEO might be more acceptable to them. Of course, it shouldn’t be a playpen!

        Like

    • Two sides,
      I wanted to flesh out my comment because it could have given the wrong tone of disagreement. It’s not disagreement at all but sincere pondering. Various jurisdictions have tried different things to have, what they allege, as independent investigations. Not long ago I blogged about an Illinois statute pertaining to revamping investigations of police conduct. Now, we see that the “independent” applied to a journalist who would not take “no” for an answer to have the video of the killing of Laquan McDonald released to the public.

      I can’t help but think, and believe, that had the court not ordered the release of that video, Van Dyke would still be on paid desk duty with no criminal charges.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Two sides to a story

        I didn’t take your comment as anything but pondering – it’s a complicated issue and will probably take many years to sort out.

        It’s gobsmacking that the video could be suppressed for so long. I’m glad it wasn’t destroyed.

        Like

  15. The role of the police is to protect citizens.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hey Micheline,
      You are correct. It seems that now the police do more profiling to stop citizens than they do arriving in response to calls from citizens for help. One of the things that puzzled me, especially in Chicago, is how many officers were patrolling the streets stopping people for looking suspicious, but calls about burglaries and robberies often resulted in telling alleged victims to come to the station to file a report.

      Liked by 1 person

      • That’s unfortunate. I had a car accident and it was my fault. I was visibly shaken, so the person who hit my car filled the papers out, etc. and because no one could take me home, he called the police. The policeman comforted me, offered to take me to a hospital, drove me home, unlocked the door for me and left a card with his phone number, just in case I needed more help. I couldn’t believe it.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Micheline,
          It is so good to hear about your positive experience. I’m so happy for you, and the citizens of your town. The police officer is to be commended, as also the person who hit your car for calling them to help you.

          Liked by 4 people

          • I agree. The person who hit my car was a very good man. Who else would have thought of calling the police and stayed until the policeman arrived. In fact, he phoned me the next morning to ask how I was. I was very lucky. No one complains about the police in this town. They are very well trained.

            Liked by 1 person

    • Two sides to a story

      Except that in many places, if you ask LEO what their role is, they’ll tell you it’s to enforce laws. For the most part, they don’t work for citizens – they work for the corporate or civic agenda, whatever that may be.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. yahtzeebutterfly

    Liked by 2 people

  17. chuquestaquenumber1

    GUILTY.GUILTY.GUILTY. For too long white men especially white cops have not been punished for raping black females. Whether they’re little girls to senior citizens,black females have had to endure rape from white men. So this verdict is to be applauded. I applaud the victims for coming forward to demand justice. The activists who made sure this rapist cop crimes were brought to the forefront. The media people get a negative review. They gave Jameis Winston CLEARED of rape more attention than a white cop on Trial with multiple counts now do found GUILTY of rape.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. I kept losing my comment, it wouldn’t post, so I’ll try to at least post again my main thought.

    About The video of the victims.
    I consider those women & the 17yr girl heroes for speaking out. Hearing some of their stories I kept thinking that I don’t think I could’ve done it. I don’t think I could’ve gotten up there and told all those ppl, a whole court room full of ppl, that someone had done those things to me. And I thank god for the ppl who stood by them, helped them through the trial. I’m just so glad they got some
    justice.

    One more try.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. yahtzeebutterfly

    Liked by 1 person

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