Former Cop Michael Slager Denied Bond

Michael_Slager_MEM_150911_12x5_1600

Michael Slager in court on Sept. 10, 2015

Former North Charleston officer Michael Slager was indicted by a grand jury in the shooting death of Walter Scott.  He has been charged with murder. Slager was arrested on April 7, 2015, when a citizen who took the video of Slager shooting Walter made it public. If convicted, Slager faces a sentence of 30 years to life without parole. Slager was denied bond and has been in jail. It is said that Dylan Roof, the man who killed 9 people in an AME church, has a cell next to or across from Slager.

The video of Slager shooting 8 times at Walter as Walter ran became very controversial. Slager shot Walter 5 times in the back, killing him. Those who tend to support the shooting, like Slager, argue what took place before the actual shooting. In effort to have the court set bond, Slager’s attorney argued that Walter had cocaine and alcohol in his system. Slager’s story of Walter trying to take his taser and other things do not appear to justify shooting Walter in the back as he was running away.

Chris Stewart, an attorney for the Scott family, said that the allegations in the motion for bond are “just distraction” Slager shooting Walter in the backand that none of it has anything to do with Walter having trace cocaine in his system and nothing to do with Slager shooting Walter 5 times in the back.

Slager is in isolation for his own protection because he is in jeopardy from other inmates as a former cop, his lawyer told ABC News, and so he only has one hour a day to walk around freely.  He is let out for one hour between 2 and 5 a.m. each day.

Last week in court, Slager argued that he is not a flight risk or danger to the community, and that he would follow the rules for house arrest because he wanted to see his infant son. The judge said he needed more time to decide if the former cop should be released on bond.

Today, South Carolina Circuit Judge Clifton Newman denied Slager bond saying that he “constitutes an unreasonable danger to the community.”

Posted on 09/15/2015, in Cases, Cops Gone Wild, Walter Scott and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 47 Comments.

  1. They need to put him in “real jail” and not in isolation for his own safety. He had no concept of personal safety for Walter Scott who he gunned down like an animal… and then tried to cover it up. My vote is to place him in general population at the prison!!!

    Liked by 5 people

    • Hey Roach! Slager, like Roof and other controversial persons awaiting trial, suffer the results of being placed in isolation. They want them to live to stand trial. Slager is unhappy about it but that is what he gets.

      Liked by 3 people

      • You’re right. They would never make it to trial if they were placed with the regular prisoners. They would get beaten, raped (like Wyatt on The Have and Have Nots), and murdered…

        Liked by 1 person

  2. scrodriguez

    Slagers attorney stated Walters DNA was on the taser, I believe if it is its touch DNA and that took place when Scott broke free you can see Scott pull free to run and the taser fly likely where the touch DNA took place.

    Then we have this other story of the taser being fired multiple times, that would indicate that Slager had to discharge one cartridge reload another recharge and fire meaning there was simply NO time for any type of struggle.

    Again there are two major factors here

    The first being obvious, Slager planted that taser next to scotts body.

    the second is what some did not catch, When Slager radio’s dispatch he says “Suspect down multiple shots to the chest”

    He already knew what lie to tell he grabbed my taser was going to shoot me with it so I shot him in the chest.

    God bless the young man who recorded it all..

    Liked by 5 people

    • The argument of distraction has happened in other cases, which is people deflect from the fact that “he ran.” To shoot at a person running away for what they allegedly did before running is not self-defense but rather, revengeful execution. That is why Slager was indicted.

      Liked by 6 people

  3. The beauty is that this young man was there to record this bad cop carry out his evil. The fact that were able to live it firsthand via the recording is simply mind blowing and poetic justice… all in one. Can you imagine the ones that we never get to see?

    Liked by 4 people

  4. Thank God a judge that sees it as we do. This man can’t return to society, keep him locked up. He has a reason to run stating that he won’t is really in my opinion saying that he will take off. Job well done Your Honor!

    Liked by 5 people

  5. Seeing the Scott video is sickening however I’m disheartened by those whose thirst for vengeance in the name of ‘justice’ runs to denial of due process. Perhaps it is the idealistic American in me but vengeance is something I just can’t get behind for any defendant.

    It’s frustrating to see the number of questionable cases placing doubt on the prosecutorial process. If slager were still a gun toting officer I’d agree he represents a threat to the community otherwise I’m wondering if video snippets has become the new measure of whether defendants are guilty till sentenced foregoing a trial. If so that doesn’t bode well for any defendant caught on video at the crucial moment. Filming police interactions is a good way to weed out the bad apples which this case appears to be and events like the recent conviction for punching a driver in the head. Still we must treat all defendants as we’d want them treated if they are our sibling, parent or best friend making allowance for what we didn’t see on the video.

    My fear is that if we’re quick to convict in the media then juries will be quick to convict on cases without the same level of media because they see a standard that doesn’t make allowances for innocent until proven guilty. If a shopper is seen on store video taking an item from a store shelf and placing it in their pocket the assumption would be guilt unless the rest of the video is seen showing them remove item from pocket and placing it on display nearest exit door. The shopper was guilty of a momentary lapse in judgement but to be charged, prosecuted and found guilty without due process would be the true crime IMO.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lurking,
      Denying bond is not vengeance. There’s a funny thing about the law. It’s suppose to be consistent without regard for the accused. We see that in this case. Dylan Roof was also denied bond, and I suspect that anyone else in that jurisdiction who is charged with murder was also denied bond. In other words, the judge cannot consider that because Slager was a police officer, that he could give him slack and set a bond.

      Regarding the video, the charge is murder. That is what was caught on camera. What happened previous to Walter running is not relevant because Slager did not fire his weapon until after Walter took off running. Your analogy of an alleged shoplifter is good, but it addresses what happened after the person put an item in the pocket then removed it. In Slager’s case, he doesn’t have the power of resurrecting the dead so there was nothing he could do to undo Walter’s death.

      By the way, the standard of innocent until proven guilty by a court of law also applies to the deceased. What we are seeing too often now is that the deceased is placed on trial in the court of public opinion in order to justify why they deserved to be killed.

      Liked by 6 people

      • yahtzeebutterfly

        Regarding the video, the charge is murder. That is what was caught on camera. What happened previous to Walter running is not relevant because Slager did not fire his weapon until after Walter took off running.”

        (I added the bold print for emphasis.)

        I agree completely with you, Xena.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you!

        Like

    • scrodriguez

      He is innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. This is normal procedure when one is accused of a crime. They sit in jail until trial or they post bond. In this case bond was denied the reason being is because of the seriousness of the crime. Let’s not forget the video shows a couple things;
      1) Walter was shot in the back multiple times
      2) Slager planted the taser next to Walter
      That is enough when you couple that with the type of crime to deny him bond. It shows he had a motive to cover this up.

      Liked by 6 people

    • No one who killed, who shot a cop in the back as he was running away, would EVER have been granted bond.

      Like

  6. Xena,
    I couldn’t have articulated it better myself. Kudos on that response.

    Liked by 4 people

  7. Where he belongs….

    Liked by 3 people

  8. scrodriguez

    This video shows the following

    1) There was no struggle for the taser. Walter simply pulls free and runs for his life

    2) as Walter runs you see the taser wires gain tension and the taser cartage trails along with Walter as he runs from Slager

    3) Slager draws his pistol and shoots Walter Scott in the back. He fired 7 or 8 times and 5 bullets hit Walter.

    4) Slager then cuffs Walter, calls into dispatch and states “Suspect down multiple shots to the chest he went for my taser”

    We know he wasn’t shot in the chest. Those are exit wounds but you can clearly see Slager’s plan to cover this up!!

    5) Slager then runs over picks up his taser and plants it right next to Scott to solidify the cover up.

    The only problem here is Slager has someone recording him murdering an unarmed man running away and Slager planted evidence to support his story.

    Liked by 4 people

  9. Zena thanks for kind response. I think my comment conflated denial of bond with hopes that Slager would get his due in general population. Roach’s comment echoes sentiments often spoken so my comment and this expanded version relate to the prevalence of this train of thought rather than a rebuttal to their opinion.

    To me saying that Slager deserves whatever he’d get in general population equates to saying Scott deserved to be shot. Neither is related, relevant or an appropriate reciprocal as a form of Justice. It seems a bit ironic to encourage or applaud general population inmates taking a life because there is damning video supporting the charges before or after a trial. There is no way to justify or rationalize either killing.

    Given the number of overturned death sentences in the USA it’s a stretch to even consider its merits for the most heinous and premeditated offenses. Tech advances like DNA are hampered with prosecutorial misconduct be it official, tampered jury or even persuasive misguided/mistaken witnesses. The video showing Scott’s death is horrific it doesn’t justify killing Slager unless you’re also willing to kill every inmate charged with a shooting death.

    Scott had an advantage many gun death victims don’t …he knew he was being chased by an armed man and was at risk of being shot, this in no way implies Scott deserved or should have been shot. Should we hope inmates kill the gang enforcer who didn’t have the advantage of police training, a taser or rules too? If they miss their intended target and take out an innocent six year old in the family vehicle or a nine year old laying on a bed doing homework or too many other victims who didn’t know a bullet was chasing them? Do we make excuses that gangs don’t have a union watching their back to keep them on the street to rationalize wishing cops dead at the hands of inmates? They meant to ….intent….stop a fleeing subject…a lesson …scare…or perhaps street speak….pay back….fuck some shit up. Do we wish death only if the shooting victim or someone else made a video they’re willing to make public? Do we wish death only if we’re sympathetic to the victim? Where does it end? When does the value of living breathing humans truly mean something?

    Despite disagreement with the context of judge’s rationale as quoted denial of bond isn’t an issue in this case. Slager and his family may be safer with him in PC. I still think too many defendants are held in jail because they’re assumed guilty as charged vs an ongoing threat to society. Bond has become a luxury for the rich, well connected or politically safe rather than a tool to ensure the defendant will show up for trial. Bond is routinely used as a punitive measure rather than a submission defendants make as their contribution to the well being of society as a whole. So what if we give the guilty credit for time served, we can’t give the ‘not guilty’ back their time.

    It’s heartening that you mention due process for Scott since too many folks assume events escalated and the fault lies with the dead, to me this is absolutely not true! Aside from making the point that he had an awareness not available to innocent kids who shared his fate I have never spoken about Scott. There is no value whatsoever to me saying what he could, should, would or ought to have done. None of that or Slager’s trial outcome will change my wholehearted belief that Scott didn’t deserve to die. I won’t belittle his memory or insult his loved ones by saying his life is interchangeable with any other life…it isn’t.

    Like

    • Lurking,
      Since your comment is long, I’ll respond to the first point first and then read the rest;

      To me saying that Slager deserves whatever he’d get in general population equates to saying Scott deserved to be shot. Neither is related, relevant or an appropriate reciprocal as a form of Justice. It seems a bit ironic to encourage or applaud general population inmates taking a life because there is damning video supporting the charges before or after a trial. There is no way to justify or rationalize either killing.

      I don’t agree with killing, nor the death penalty. It’s because Slager has not yet stood trial and been convicted that he’s in solitary confinement. The state is giving him that measure of protection because he’s a former cops, and most inmates do not like cops, former cops, politicians, or child abusers.

      If Slager’s convicted and goes to a state prison, chances are that he will be placed in the general population.

      It’s because of this understanding that I did not and do not see a comment about putting him in general population as revengeful or a serious bad wish — because it’s not possible. Also, I realize at times that personality does not come out in words unless you know the person. There are people who comment here and say things that sound almost torturous against those who kill. But, they have participated here long enough, or I’ve visited and read their blogs long enough, to understand they are venting; relieving stress.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Hey Lurking,
      Your comment about killing and gangs and unions, etc., is not anything that I want to address because it would require too much; starting with asking questions so I can understand what you mean. I blog — I don’t not write books. 🙂 IF I were to write a book, it would not be on the issues you bring up in your comment. I don’t agree with killing PERIOD. On the subject of bond, I can offer something, but don’t have time to do the research to support what I share. One thing I will say is that bonds can vary from one county to another, one state to another, so they cannot be discussed with generalities. Bond amounts are generally requested by prosecutors.

      Regarding,

      It’s heartening that you mention due process for Scott since too many folks assume events escalated and the fault lies with the dead, to me this is absolutely not true!

      It was not stated towards you. Please don’t take it personally. Yes, people place the deceased on trial. Trayvon, (he ran); Michael (he ran); and Walter (he ran). They do it against the deceased who are unarmed. The negative things said by the court of public opinion against Sandra Bland are overwhelming, and they are generally instigated by the same persons who take it upon themselves to start combing Facebook and other social media looking for family members of the deceased, prior arrests, where they work, etc.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Hey Lurking,

      Scott had an advantage many gun death victims don’t …he knew he was being chased by an armed man and was at risk of being shot, this in no way implies Scott deserved or should have been shot.

      In my opinion, a reason why the world is shocked over the killing of Walter Scott is because we do not think, nor believe, that law enforcement should nor will shoot an unarmed person running away. Given, some people get that impression from reality tv programs such as “Cops.” On “Cops” they run after suspects who run away. They bring out the dogs and the helicopters. We don’t see law enforcement on “Cops” shooting at running suspects.

      Walter is not alive to tell us why he ran, but with so many cops using excessive force, it is reasonable to believe that some suspects run to avoid death or great bodily harm. They figure they will be eventually apprehended anyway when it is safe to surrender.

      Remember Samuel Dubose who, for whatever reason, took off in his car and officer Ray Tensing shot him in the head? Tensing claimed that Samuel tried to run over him but the video shows differently. I don’t believe that Samuel thought for a moment that he would meet his death at the barrel of a police officer’s gun.

      Then there was Patricia Cook who was shot at point-blank range while in her car by Culpeper, VA police officer Daniel Harmon-Wright. His first two shots tore into Patricia’s face and arm, but she managed to drive away as Harmon-Wright continued shooting, hitting Patricia a total of 5 times with one shot entering her brain.

      That goes to say that there are still a majority of citizens who trust that members of law enforcement will not behave like gang members who do drive-by’s, but their trust was betrayed.

      Liked by 2 people

  10. Xena thank you! I appreciate your speaking up about venting and the difficulty of a comment conveying the whole picture.

    Walter Scott and the world were betrayed. There are too many senseless killings, too many senseless deaths that we’ll never understand. Too many families having their grief compounded by a society tearing apart their loved ones social media looking to blame them rather than consider that they didn’t deserve to die. That is a sad reality.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. yahtzeebutterfly

    Jan 4 – 7:20 pm

    http://www.postandcourier.com/storyimage/CP/20160104/PC16/160109767/AR/0/AR-160109767.jpg&maxw=800&q=90

    “The former North Charleston officer who fatally shot Walter Scott was released from jail Monday night after a judge said he was troubled by a delay in the trial and granted bail.

    The decision was met with gasps from Scott’s family and with tears from Michael Slager’s wife and parents, who appeared together for the first time in the downtown Charleston courtroom. Slager was released at 7 p.m. after posting $500,000 bail, a jail spokesman said. Under a surety bond, he would have to pay $50,000 of that total.

    Under the judge’s order, he must stay on house detention in South Carolina. He can leave only for attorney and doctor visits, courtroom appearances and church services.”

    http://www.postandcourier.com/article/20160104/PC16/160109767

    Like

Your comments are welcomed.

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: