Tyler Clementi anti-bullying bill reintroduced in Congress

I hope that the Bill passes. Ashely Judd just had some things to say about cyberbullying. It’s getting national attention and it’s time for federal law.

The New Bullying Prevention

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“Schools need to take bullying, harassment and humiliation seriously, by making it official policy,” Jane Clementi said. “We support this legislation because no other student should have to feel the pain and humiliation that Tyler felt after he had been web-camed by his roommate.”


Legislation named after Tyler Clamenti was reintroduced in Congress. (Photo courtesy Facebook) Legislation named after Tyler Clamenti was reintroduced in Congress. (Photo courtesy Facebook) Lawmakers reintroduced a bill in Congress on Wednesday named after an 18-year-old Rutgers University student who committed suicide in 2010 after his roommate posted a video of his private romantic encounter with another man online.

The bill, the Tyler Clementi Higher Education Anti-Harassment Act, was introduced in the House by Rep. Mark Pocan (D-Wis.) and in the Senate by Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.). The only out lesbian in the U.S. Senate, Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.), is an original co-sponsor for the Senate bill.

In a statement, Murray said the legislation is necessary because students need…

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Posted on 03/19/2015, in Cyber-bullying, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 21 Comments.

  1. This is a good discussion. It brings forth that people do react to harassment differently and also, that Twitter’s reputation is going down the tube.

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  2. Important legislation. It touches on so many issues. Laws protecting privacy are weak. The cultural norms of privacy and personal boundaries have been hugely diminished by our voyeuristic culture egged on by advertising and the media. And our govts seem to want to strip all privacy from us. And with modern technology on top –
    A tragic and unnecessary loss of a young life – and not the only one shamed into suicide. – All for want of cultural acceptance of the right to privacy upheld by law.

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    • Yes, it is important legislation. Unlike those states that have harassment and privacy laws, I hope that the federal Bill passes and provides for stiff sentences and penalties.

      A tragic and unnecessary loss of a young life – and not the only one shamed into suicide. – All for want of cultural acceptance of the right to privacy upheld by law.

      Yes. The damage of using electronic devices to show or post the personal lives of others, is that even if the person is prosecuted, it does not undo the damage. That type of harassment extends beyond the internet into the personal lives of victims. It’s like forcing poison down the victims’ throats. The damage and scars might not be seen, but they are there.

      I’m thinking that just like states have websites to search for sexual offenders, they should also have websites to search for those in which a court has found is a harasser. Just as the harasser did things to taunt, intimidate, and humiliate their victim or victims, their faces and where they reside should forever be available so that people can identify and avoid them.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. That type of harassment extends beyond the internet into the personal lives of victims. It’s like forcing poison down the victims’ throats. The damage and scars might not be seen, but they are there.

    I accept that it is very difficult to legislate in this area of invisible psychological damage, as in bullying, sexual abuse and coercive control. So any such legislation is welcome. At least in these cases evidence exists of damage which gives the law a foothold. Another angle the law could use is this like libel? Taking a person’s private acts and displaying them in public so as to debase/demean them by taking the behaviour out of context? If the law doesn’t get a handle on this we are all vulnerable to such attacks and the only safety will be to adopt a totally celibate lifestyle and wear sack cloth continuously.

    Identifying the harassers – capital idea.

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    • If the law doesn’t get a handle on this we are all vulnerable to such attacks and the only safety will be to adopt a totally celibate lifestyle and wear sack cloth continuously.

      But then if a target victim is celibate, those intending to demean will use that to denigrate them. People who are intended to do evil and cause harm to others do not have gauges. They are kinda like Miranda Rights where anything you say or do will be used against you.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, they play like card sharps. Whatever you do you are in the wrong. And there are a lot of angles – one would be where else would peeping toms/perverts get employment which enables them to indulge themselves while being paid?

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        • Funny you mention about the employment. On Judge Judy’s program today, the defendant was awarded on her cross-complaint because her Landlord was VP of a credit union where the defendant had her account. The Landlord accessed the tenant’s account without her approval.

          In real life, a known harasser went to work as an intern for a bankruptcy attorney and began looking up clients on Facebook, found some of them who made comments that he didn’t like, and began harassing them. That gave him opportunity to threaten them with extortion of exposing their personal information if they didn’t stop expressing their opinion.

          Liked by 1 person

          • The example of the harasser in the workplace is a good one – serial harassers, bullies, stalkers often use their place of work as a platform for their activities. But laws on this are weak. eg slander/libel are common tactics, but they are Torts not crimes, so only the rich can defend themselves. But it is the acts which have to be criminalised – anyone can be labelled otherwise.
            One thing baffles me about the case. (I’m UK so maybe I’m missing something). Why were they sharing a room?

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            • You are absolutely right except that one cannot even successfully bring a tort case. This is why currently, several states are considering workplace anti bullying laws. I touch a little on this subject in my blog under a different domain:nutty consumer’s 7th rant vs. “cookie cutter” call centers cely9124.com/…/nutty-consumers-7th-rant-vs-cookie-cutter-call-centers/Aug 30, 2014 – THIS BLOG WILL FOCUS ON THE CALL CENTER EMPLOYEE AND POSSIBLE LEGAL ISSUES.

              Liked by 1 person

  4. Facebook clarifies community standards.

    Those profiles used to shame individuals or post digitally altered images that degrade people also do not meet Facebook’s standards.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-17/facebook-clarifies-policies-on-terrorist-organisations-nudity/6324606

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  5. I am strongly in favor of this legislation to protect our young people. I have already pledged to email/ or write my legislators about the need to pass this bill. This should not be a left or right issue.

    I am also supportive of anti bullying laws pertaining to the workplace but this could be resisted by the right because of their business cronyism, and so, I would never connect the two.

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    • Gronda, you just inspired me to contact my legislatures to support the Bill. Thanks. I’m already sending correspondence to state legislatures about our Harassing and Obscene Communications statutes. It’s a good law but state prosecutors don’t want to extradite when the perpetrator resides in another state. They think that the penalties are not enough for them to go through that trouble. So, they “reach out” to the perpetrators who stay quiet for about 3 months then start over again.

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  6. The student who posted the video of Tyler spent 30 days in jail. While I’m surprised he was sentenced to any time at all, it just seems to have been not enough.

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  7. Ashley Judd has the means to get this started. Then we can all follow. It must stop no matter what the cost. If you do nothing wrong, then you’ll not fight against this. Just my two cents.

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  8. Bullying must stop… full stop! Hope this passes, it would be a great start to a great victory.

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