Another View of Ferguson — Kindness, Generosity and Compassion

Thanks for bringing us the other side; the side of kindness.

Kindness Blog

Day after day, most of the images and stories from Ferguson, Missouri, have been depressing.

The quiet Midwest suburb appears to have devolved into a place where armored vehicles patrol streets, people can’t stop fighting, arrests are commonplace and tear gas pollutes the air.

Mike Knox has been staying at his barbershop until 4 a.m during the Ferguson protests to ward off looters Mike Knox has been staying at his barbershop until 4 a.m during the Ferguson protests to ward off looters

But there is actually good happening in Ferguson. There have been some extraordinary acts of kindness and generosity from people trying hard to hold their city together.

White, who lives in St. Louis County, walked a mile to give free water to protesters.

“We pooled together as a community to bring this,” she said. “So, we can stay…

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Posted on 08/20/2014, in Michael Brown - Ferguson and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 28 Comments.

  1. yahtzeebutterfly

    Yes, beautiful acts of love and kindness.

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  2. umm. last night this lady handing out water to protesters was maced by cops for not moving fast enough. I’ll try to find the tweet.. smh

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    • I saw that too, I think it was in the Daily Kos..maybe,

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    • That requirement that demonstrators much “march” violates the First Amendment. There are sit-in’s. There are people who gather to listen to a speaker. The requirement that the people continue to move frustrates all manner of organization.

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      • I’m not even sure we’re still in America when I see things like this!

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        • Mindyme,

          I’m not even sure we’re still in America when I see things like this!

          HA! That’s the problem. It’s the SAME America in some areas as it was in 1865. In other cities or states, it’s the same America as it was in the 1960’s and still yet, some areas that came into the 21st century are now going back in history.

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  3. Such a beautiful tribute! Thank You for this uplifting article, full of hope!

    My heart is heavy for the young man in the tweet who was being counseled by the Clergy woman. Some people will always think what he says they think.. and for that I am so sorry.

    I believe in my heart that there are more of us who want unity than there are those who live for division.

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  4. I just saw on the nightly news that the officer who pointed his weapon at protestors last night saying he would kill them, has been relieved of duty indefinitely.

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  5. You’re welcome

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    • I can’t watch it yet.
      Sad and crying

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    • I didn’t see him clutching the knife ‘over hand’ as they said. It is very hard to watch.

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      • yahtzeebutterfly

        I know, Mindy. I am still shaken from watching the video.

        You are correct. This eyewitness video contradicts Police Chief Dotson’s statement that the 2 officers shot Kajieme Powell when Kajieme came within 2 or 3 feet of the officers while holding the knife in an “overhand grip.”

        Watching the video, I saw NO overhand grip and I saw that Kajieme was MANY MORE feet away from the officers.

        Also, the officers began firing at Kajieme seconds after they arrived there.

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    • Joseph, I know. I was going to write on it, but for the last month of so, we have been overwhelmed with murders and murders by cops. That does not mean that you and others cannot discuss it — I just need to rest from writing for a few days until motivated to write on something other than death.

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  6. yahtzeebutterfly

    Let there be peace
    Let there be love

    Let there be reverence for life

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    • yahtzeebutterfly

      May the day come when all people

      Touch with kindness
      See with compassion
      Listen with understanding
      Dwell as community
      Share in abundance
      Relax in friendship

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  7. For some strange reason. I cried reading about the acts of kindness, not the protesters. Protesters have a right to do it. It’s the police that I am so angry with. They don’t seem to be trying to get any order at all. If I were an officer there. I’d speak to anyone I was face to face with and I’d say, “listen, it’s sad what happened, I am with all of you, I want justice, and justice is (telling) or seeking the truth.” But all they do is aim guns, spray teargas and threaten them more.

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    • Shyloh,

      Protesters have a right to do it. It’s the police that I am so angry with.

      Exactly. Even from the moment Michael Brown was killed, the police took a position that they needed to bring out dogs rather than communicate with the people. To bring military equipment and aim assault rifles at people speaks volumes about their attitude towards the citizens.

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  8. yahtzeebutterfly

    Look what I found in the article I will post at the bottom:

    ………..most [GRAND JURIES] just follow the lead of prosecutors, giving them enormous leeway. Not only do the prosecutors get to decide what charges to seek. They also end up choosing what evidence to bring forward—and how to present it. That’s particularly true in Missouri, I’m told, because it’s relatively rare for witnesses to provide testimony directly. Usually police officers read summaries of witness reports. Normal rules of evidence don’t apply; hearsay testimony is admissible.

    Look at the sentence again!!!! :

    “Normal rules of evidence don’t apply; hearsay testimony is admissible.”

    “Ferguson Protesters Want the Grand Jury to Deliver “Justice.” Here Are Two Reasons They Might Not Get It.”

    http://www.newrepublic.com/article/119151/ferguson-grand-jury-takes-brown-shooting-whether-charge-wilson

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  9. yahtzeebutterfly

    Question, If I recall correctly Angela Corey charged gz with 2nd degree murder so that she could avoid going to a Grand Jury which would have been required for a charge of 1st degree murder.

    Is the legal system the same in Missouri?

    If it is the same in Missouri, does if possibly mean that the prosecutor going to a Grand Jury mean that he, in fact, might be seeking a charge of 1st degree murder?

    Like

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